Announcement regarding current restrictions at Iceland’s borders

As from 15 January 2021, all passengers traveling to Iceland who have stayed for more than 24 hours in the last 14 days in an area defined as risk by the Chief Epidemiologist, must undergo a PCR test upon arrival in Iceland, followed by a 5-6 day quarantine and a second screening at the end of quarantine period. If the second test is negative, then quarantine is lifted. 

As from 15 January 2021, all passengers traveling to Iceland who have stayed for more than 24 hours in the last 14 days in an area defined as risk by the Chief Epidemiologist, must undergo a PCR test upon arrival in Iceland, followed by a 5-6 day quarantine and a second screening at the end of quarantine period. If the second test is negative, then quarantine is lifted.

The Chief Epidemiologist shall regularly revalue which countries and areas are defined as risk having taken into consideration information from international organisations such as WHO and ECDC. Iceland’s chief epidemiologist has determined that at present all countries and territories of the world are now considered to be risk areas.

Children born in 2005 or later are not required to undergo a PCR-test upon arrival but are required to go into quarantine along with their parents or guardians after entering Iceland. Children born in 2005 and later who travel alone are however, required to undergo a PCR-test after 5 days in quarantine. If the second test is negative, then quarantine is lifted.

Testing of travellers for COVID-19 at Iceland’s borders is free of charge.

Only in rare circumstances, such as in the case of valid medical reason, exemptions from double screening will be made and the person in question can quarantine for 14 days instead.

Certain exemptions from quarantine and testing requirements

1. Certificates regarding previous COVID-19 infection that are accepted at the border in Iceland.
2. Certificate of vaccination against COVID-19 accepted at the border. Certificate of vaccination from the EEA/EFTA-area if they fulfill the requirements as set forth by the Chief Epidemiolologist. Information about certificates regarding previous COVID-19 infection that are accepted at the border in Iceland .

Certificates from the World Health Organization (WHO) will also be accepted once WHO has authorized their use for COVID-19 vaccinations and set criteria for which vaccines can be listed in their certificate. Presently, COVID-19 vaccinations registered in the International Certificate of Vaccination (the Carte Jaune or Yellow Card) cannot be accepted as such registration is not done according to WHO instructions.

For more information visit Covid.is


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